Hiking and peak bagging stats

Intro

I keep good records of my hikes and especially the peaks I have climbed and some of the resulting stats are given below. Note that a "ranked" peak is one that rises at least "X" feet from the highest saddle (the "key saddle") that connects it to a higher peak. This is sometimes called "prominence", but I think the term is a bit too loaded and I prefer to call it "rise". The 300-foot rise level is often used for a complete census of peaks, but some people favor a tougher standard like 1000 or 2000 feet. For completeness I even track my ascents down to the 100-foot level, although I don't make an effort to work on those very minor peaks. You can see from my stats that I also generally prefer high peaks to "prominent" peaks.

None of my listed accomplishments are particularly impressive, although they are not trivial, either. These stats are complete through March 2009, and I started climbing mountains in July 1994.

Total ascents

Ascents of named peaks or ranked peaks at the 100-foot level: 838
Ascents of ranked peaks at the 300-foot level: 675
Ascents of ranked peaks at the 300-foot level above 12000ft: 129
Ascents of ranked peaks at the 300-foot level above 13000ft: 103
Most ascents of a peak in Arizona: 238; Mount Francis near Prescott
Most ascents of a peak in Colorado: 37; Green Mountain near Boulder
Most ascents of a "high" peak: 12; Medicine Bow Peak, Wyoming (12,013ft)

Different peaks climbed

Overall

This table is a compilation of my climbs organized by "rise", but also includes a tally of the number of peaks where I have hiked at or below the altitude of the "key saddle" that defines the "rise" or "prominence" of the peak. One might call this a "prominence ascent" of a mountain. I have also given some statistics on the degree to which I climbed a peak from at or below the level of the key saddle. See my prominence score page for definitions of and rationale for these numbers.

CategoryPeaksProm AscentMean Prom ScoreMean Relative Prom Score
Named or 100-299ft rise 71 67 1760.977
300-499ft rise189178 3750.986
500-999ft rise104 84 6320.937
1000-1999ft rise34 2411920.817
2000-2999ft rise19 1421030.843
3000-4999ft rise 8 320440.578
5000-9999ft rise 4 247360.769
300-9999ft rise358305 7050.936

Colorado

Ranked peaks at the 300-foot level: 110
Top 1000 list of ranked peaks at the 300-foot level ("Millenials"): 103
Ranked peaks at the 300-foot level above 13000ft: 95 (out of 637)
Top 200 list of ranked peaks at the 300-foot level ("Bicentennials"): 63
Top 100 list of ranked peaks at the 300-foot level ("Centennials"): 52
"Official" 14000-foot peaks (the "14ers"; 54 total): 38

Apropos the previous table, I have put together some wizzy completion maps for my 13ers/14ers. (Missing my latest 5 peaks at the moment.)

Arizona

Ranked peaks at the 300-foot level: 229
Ranked peaks at the 300-foot level above 7000ft: 157
Ranked peaks at the 300-foot level above 8000ft: 54
Ranked peaks at the 300-foot level above 9000ft: 19
(9000ft is very close to the cutoff for a Top 100 list, about 40% of which are on Indian land or have other access restrictions)

Distances and gains

Nearly all of the following "mountain" numbers involve summit hikes. In several cases, a "dayhike" is actually multiple summit hikes in a day with short drives between trailheads. The rare multi-day trip has been broken into individual days.

Days hiking in the mountains: 647
Distance hiked in the mountains: 3648 miles/5866 km
Elevation gained in the mountains: 1,113,440 feet
(Total elevation gained anywhere hiking, running, and walking since 1994: 1,483,690 feet)

Number of mountain dayhikes with more than 1000 feet of gain: 569
Number of mountain dayhikes with more than 2000 feet of gain: 182
Number of mountain dayhikes with more than 3000 feet of gain: 82
Number of mountain dayhikes with more than 4000 feet of gain: 37
Number of mountain dayhikes with more than 5000 feet of gain: 18
Number of mountain dayhikes with more than 6000 feet of gain: 3
Number of mountain dayhikes with more than 7000 feet of gain: 1

Most elevation gained in 1 calender month: 24,340 feet (all hiking; Jul 1995)
Most elevation gained in 3 calender months: 65,890 feet (57,530 hiking; Jul-Sep 2007)
Most elevation gained in 6 calender months: 126,940 feet (109,320 hiking; Jun-Nov 2007)
Most elevation gained in 12 calender months: 241,000 feet (200,410 hiking; Jan 2007-Dec 2007)

Most days with 1000 feet of gain in 1 calender month: 15 (Mar 2007)
Most days with 1000 feet of gain in 3 calender months: 41 (Mar-May 2007)
Most days with 1000 feet of gain in 6 calender months: 73 (Mar-Aug 2007)
Most days with 1000 feet of gain in 12 calender months: 143 (Jan 2007-Dec 2007)

Number of mountain dayhikes of 6 miles or more: 218
Number of mountain dayhikes of 8 miles or more: 132
Number of mountain dayhikes of 10 miles or more: 60
Number of mountain dayhikes of 12 miles or more: 38
Number of mountain dayhikes of 15 miles or more: 12
Number of mountain dayhikes of 20 miles or more: 2

State and county highpoints

I'm not really a "highpointer", but I have reached the highest points of Colorado, Minnesota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Arizona (in that order). I have reached a total of 17 county highpoints in Colorado, 3 in South Dakota, 2 each in Arizona and New Mexico, and 1 each in Wyoming, Minnesota, and Iowa, for a grand total of 27. This is definitely not something I'm actively working on, and is mainly just something that is easy to track.

Odds and ends

I have climbed 14 out of the 15 highest peaks (and 19 out of 22) in Colorado at the 300-foot rise level.

I have climbed the 17 highest peaks of the Tenmile-Mosquito Range in Colorado at the 300-foot rise level, and 27 out of 30 ranked 13ers.

I have climbed 5 out of the 6 highest ranked peaks in Minnesota at the 300-foot level. (This is actually more interesting and rare than it sounds. See my Minnesota peakbagging page for more information.)

I have also climbed 5 out of the 6 highest ranked peaks in South Dakota at the 300-foot level. (I don't have a fetish for the number "6"; it just works out that SD has 6 ranked 7000-foot peaks. In any case, I have reached the 1st and 2nd highest peaks of all three of these states using the 300-foot criterion.)

I made the final ascent of the 2nd Millenium of Green Mountain in Boulder (11:50pm on December 31st, 2000), and was correspondingly the first person to stand on the summit in the 3rd Millenium.


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File last modified: 31 March 2009

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