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Griggs Restaurant (Closed)
9007 Montana Ave.
El Paso, TX

RESTAURANT INFO. RATING TYPE FEATURES BEST ITEMS/ SPECIAL RATINGS
Cost: $$
Accessible: Yes
20 Mexican
New Mexican
Cooking Oil: Vegetable
Smoking: No Smoking
Best Items: Green Enchiladas, Chiles Rellenos, Slaw
Red Enchiladas:
Green Enchiladas:
Chiles Rellenos:
Chicken Tostadas:
Chicken Tacos:
Chile con Carne:
Rolled Tacos:
Chicken Sopa:
Slaw:
Chips: , Salsa:
Corn Tortillas:
LAST TRIED TIMES TRIED
30-Nov-06 10+
Note:  As of 2009 Griggs Restaurant has closed, but the New Mexican style food that made the restaurant such an El Paso institution is now being served at Peppe's Restaurant at 6761 Doniphan Drive in Canutillo, Texas (in El Paso's Upper Valley). The owner of Peppe's was a long time chef at the west side Griggs Restaurant, and the recipes from Griggs have now been passed on to this new restaurant. Peppe's is located a couple of miles north of the original Griggs Restaurant on Doniphan. The phone number of Peppe's is (915) 877-2152.

A restaurant that has been around as long as Griggs runs the risk of falling off the radar screen, especially when it is set back from Montana Avenue and only a non-lighted sign is visible from the street. It has also been through Griggs' dining rooms greet visitors 
with several pianos and antique furniture quite a few bumps with the closing of its Mesa Hills location and the on-again, off-again saga of the original Doniphan location (the original restaurant closed, then the children of the owners opened it as Griggs Family Restaurant, then it became became Dos Seņoritas under different ownership, and finally a branch of Sombras del Pasado before it closed for good).

I have felt that the food quality has also been on a roller-coaster ride with the different owners, managers, and cooks. Anyone who knew the Griggs family cannot help associate the friendly smiles they would get and the home cooked style food that was served with the restaurants bearing their name. Of late, though, this has seemed a distant memory as the food seems to get more anglosized, or tourist oriented (as I feel that it always has been) but without the special touches I thought the food always demonstrated when the Griggs family was in charge of the kitchen. A chilehead could overlook the wimpy salsa and mild chiles because of the quality of the food, but it does not seem to have the same quality at the Montana location.

Certain items at the Montana location (and at the other locations when they were open) always seem to hit the spot regardless of the cooks that are in the kitchen. One is the New Mexico style Chile Relleno, a Mesilla Valley chile surrounded by an egg batter, with no sauce on top. At times the relleno has been beyond greasy (this has been rare, though). It has only been less than enjoyable, though, when the cheese Green Enchilada, Rolled Taco, Chile Relleno, 
and Chile con Carne inside the relleno failed to melt (this has been quite rare indeed). I normally order combination dinners at Griggs, but with any dinner ordered I would recommend the inclusion of a relleno.

Green Enchiladas are another standout item, and are rarely less than perfect. Of course, perfection depends on the standard being used. The green chile used is not the spicy variety served at Chope's in La Mesa, New Mexico, or a number of other New Mexican style restaurants. The one at Griggs is a mild version that even people not used to eating any kind of chiles would enjoy, yet I think the flavor rivals just about any enchilada served in the Land of Enchantment.

The Red Enchiladas have never been standout items at Griggs. They were excellent at the Doniphan location, however.

Chile colorado, known as Chile con Carne at Griggs had a superior New Mexico style chile at the original Griggs on Doniphan. The one served at the Montana location, though, seems to lack the flavor that made the other one so good. Likewise the roast pork does not taste like anything special, while the meat at the original Griggs seemed to embody the essence of New Mexico style pork that made eating this dish seem like a special experience. If you need to make a call you may 
need to ask for one of the other phones

The slaw is outstanding, and I like the fact that whole beans are served rather than refried.

I do not know whether Griggs' tortillas are home made, but they certainly taste as if they are. I always found this to be a much more pleasant way to fill up on carbohydrates than trying to down the usually stale chips with the practically chile-less salsa.

The food at Griggs may be familiar to those who have eaten at La Posta in Mesilla, New Mexico or El Pinto in Albuquerque. The Griggs family were early settlers in Mesilla, and various family members founded these three restaurants (all of which are still in business, but with different owners). While the current owners of the New Mexico restaurants have made them "touristy" on purpose, Griggs in El Paso has retained the original Griggs family recipes fairly well (they used to publish a recipe book that has some fairly authentic dishes). I cannot say the Griggs Restaurant serves totally authentic New Mexican cuisine, but it is one of the closest experiences El Pasoans can find to the type of food that would be served in Las Cruces or Albuquerque.

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