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Sushi Neko
4316 N. Western Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK
(405) 528-8862
Cost: $$$
Hours: Closed Sun.
Sushi Neko web site
22 Japanese Tea: Green (brewed) House
Smoking: No Smoking
Tempura: shrimp
Salmon Teriyaki:
Super White Tuna:

Reviews: AOL City Guide
12-Sep-06 2
Sushi Neko, located in the old Will Rogers Theatre on Western, is part of a strip of upscale restaurants in a revitalized area of the city. With the option of eating at the sushi bar, at one of the modern Japanese style tables, or outdoors on the patio, patrons can feel as comfortable spending time at a leisurely meal as past generations whose period of escape into Hollywood's latest releases seemed all too short.

Sushi Neko is under the same ownership as Musashi's Japanese Steakhouse across the street, and as the name implies has a large sushi bar with a fairly extensive selection of nigiri, sashimi, and sushi rolls. Sushi Neko's dedicated sushi chefs put their expertise into providing some of the freshest and best sushi in the Southwest. Although many customers seem to venture into the world of raw fish quite slowly, with the California Roll being a big seller here, the more traditional sushi gives Oklahomans a quite decent taste of this Japanese delicacy.

The Super White Tuna is probably one of the more flavorful types of sushi served. As the name implies, it is much more than the typical bland white fish. These are large chunks of Pacific Ocean tuna that contain the type of flavor that are almost guaranteed to convert skeptics into sushi lovers. The tuna had only the slightest hint that it had not come immediately from a fresh fish market--in fact I believe it is impossible to import fish to Oklahoma without putting it into a frozen state. The amount of degradation, though, seemed to be totally within acceptable limits for sushi served in America's interior regions.

A bowl of Udon seemed to be prepared with the skill found in some of the better Japanese restaurants. The deceptively transparent liquid absorbed the flavors of the noodles, vegetables, spices, and other ingredients into an aromatic broth that typified the best of Asian soups.

The Salmon Teriyaki was made with Atlantic salmon, and was slightly better than at Tokyo (a restaurant I frequent located farther north on Western). However, Tokyo has the edge on the teriyaki sauce.

Sushi Neko and Tokyo seem to be the primary sources of authentic, Japanese style cuisine in Oklahoma City (the Japanese steak houses with the knife twirling shows are in a totally separate category). From my limited sampling of dishes it seems that both Sushi Neko and Tokyo have items that I would consider the best in OKC. Sushi Neko seems to have the edge in sushi, while Tokyo is so close in quality I really would not mind going to either place. The one big drawback I find in Sushi Neko is the lack of the inexpensive "box lunch" plates that are served at Tokyo. My best recommendation for the time being would be to go to Tokyo for lunch and Sushi Neko for dinner.

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