Dislikes

— dislikes —
I don’t do as much Unix as I used to so I’m not keeping up and it isn’t as easy to
remember stuff I used to do.

— dislikes —
can’t think of anything.

— dislikes —
Sometimes I have trouble understanding the technical aspects of a server

— dislikes —
Nothing

— dislikes —
My high speed access is via Skynetbb microwave link to a terminal on a neighbor’s
hangar thence a (radio, again) LAN. So if neighbor loses power or Skynetbb is
nuked for any reason, I’m out of touch. (Not a big deal, I have a dog who loves
attention and books.)

— dislikes —
nothing, your doing a great job

— dislikes —
I develope/maintain on Debian. I had considered second versions on centOS after
Eskimo shellx became available. Now it seems Eskimo may be forced to Scientific. I
will stay with supporting one version on debian.


Debian is at debian.eskimo.com, graphical access is via x2go only, no NX or VNC. Scientific Linux is available at scientific.eskimo.com, x2go, NX, and VNC all available.  It is almost identical to the existing CentOS.

— dislikes —
I have discovered that some emails would not get through to me. It’s been difficult
to resolve which end was at fault, and most troubling would be the emails that I
wasn’t aware of that might never have been received.


If mail doesn’t get through, Look in your spam box.  We only reject mail if it contains a virus, in which case we tell the sending side which virus their e-mail is infected with. Mail scored as spam is accepted but placed in your spam folder.


— dislikes —
occasional downtime with no news


This happened in my absence.  The old unreliable infrastructure has been replaced with modern Intel based systems running the most current Centos and Scientific Linux releases. The only downtime regularly experienced now are maintenance periods early Saturday mornings from around midnight-2am, and when these occur they are posted in advance in Eskimo News.  We have also had a couple of updates go bad that have interrupted specific services briefly and one that affected all the machines for a couple of hours.  In cases where our web server is down, we post to Yahoo Groups, Facebook, and Twitter.


— dislikes —
No real complaints.

— dislikes —
There are simply many features that I don’t use — games and such. For me, the
biggest annoyance is the TINY SIZE of the login interface for webmail/squirrel mail.
I access this page from many devices including pad devices and it is so hard not to
fatfinger when I am logging in. If you simply made the boxes bigger that would be a
huge improvement. There are annoyances about the layout of the web mail interface
(the location of the delete button makes no sense at all, for example) but these
issues are so minor in comparison with my having problems logging in that it’s not
worth talking about.

— dislikes —
Not a strong dislike at all. Sometimes when I am troubleshooting I can’t find stuff
on your website. I lost my harddrive and had to reset up my email info but found it
hard to locate the instructions that would help me.

— dislikes —
I can’t think of anything that I dislike about Eskimo.

— dislikes —
You need to be a somewhat technical minded end-user to understand certain informal
updates. The fact that the main website looks a little bit “old school” may be a
little bit scary for new customers as businesses these days have those clean and
fancy websites with models with a big smile and a nice suit. Ex. godaddy.com

Another thing with Eskimo is that if you want a service, you have to order, pay and
wait for services to be set up manually, thus most providers these days the whole
process is automated.

I think that if Eskimo wants to move from us “good old schoolers” to the “new type
of customer” these days that don’t have much knowledge, there needs to be some sort
of Control Panel integrated to the web services, say Cpanel or similar so end-user
can get access other than the shell.


The reason I haven’t done Cpanel is that it is an indirect security risk. The way it requires the web server to be configured to work would be less secure than the way we have It. Long term project I’m working on is my own interpretation would would provide that instant gratification without the security and performance limitations of doing things the way Cpanel requires.  But this is a very large long term project.

If you make a CGI on most of these sites you’ll find all of them execute with the same UID, that of the web server, and in most cases they all operate on the same IP address as well, which means https can’t work properly except in the very newest browers.  Here, every users executable code executes with their own UID and each site has it’s own IP address so that https can be fully and properly supported.

The problem with executing code with the same UID is a flaw in one customers PHP or CGI code can jeopardize every site. The way we do it, a flaw in a customers code can only harm their site. And the need for https, anybody that’s been following the information Edward Snowden made available should understand the desirability of that.

And, I realize you are not a current customer, but generally most things, virtual domains, requests for WordPress, Drupal, Concrete5, and other similar apps, are setup within 15 minutes.


Also I think that some of the writing style on the website should be changed from
“me” to “us” as in an example: “Thank you for contacting us” or “We here at Eskimo
appreciate…” and so forth.

I will become a user again in not a long time I guess and I like Eskimo North a lot,
but again overall I think the services are a bit too complex and difficult for the
average Internet user to understand.

Average Internet users these days don’t really know a lot about Shells, DNS, IMAP,
FTP etc.

— dislikes —
the occasional service outage is inconvenient, but I know stuff happens & this is
rare enough it’s really not a bother.

— dislikes —
There are some tasks that, from my perspective, still need knowledge about Unix or
shell environments that I wish were offered in low-tech form. See my comment below
on “How to Improve Eskimo”.

I checked “Eskimo is just right” in the complexity box, but response #4 (“better
documented”) is also true.

— dislikes —
Nothing. In fact, I like everything about it. From the dial days to now!

— dislikes —
Can be out of commission for many hours. Annoying, but not disruptive.

— dislikes —
Not much

— dislikes —
I do not like 2abuse someone

— dislikes —
I have never gotten into the complexities.
I started a web page, but time hasn’t gotten me back to it.
I greatly appreciate you being there and don’t want to change.

My biggest dislike is not with Eskimo North, but the in between company for which we
gave up our hard wire phone. Now, when power is out, the phone is out and my Eskimo
North and 911 are no longer there. We are working on that.

— dislikes —
Nothing i dislike about eskimo

— dislikes —
No notice of disconnect when account is due. I routinely get disconnected and have
to call to make a credit card payment. I have thousands of things to keep track of
in my life. Sending me a bill a month before my account is due (for an annually
paid account) would be helpful in avoiding a surprise disconnection. Even an
automatic payment would be better.

Updates sometimes break things with no warning. I still don’t have my RPG game
files recompiled from the switch to the new equipment/OS version. I’ll find time
someday, but meanwhile I’ve lost what few players I had after the “long darkness”.

— dislikes —
Been a happy satisfied customer for almost 20 years.

— dislikes —
Interruptions with my email periodically. I’m not sure if it’s me or Eskimo but my
outgoing mail doesn’t work on occasion, like now. I sometimes can change the port
and then it will work again. Not this time though. I’ll just wait a day or so and
it will fix itself I hope.

— dislikes —
Nothing really. I’ve been around for years.

— dislikes —
I dislike the eskimo web when there is no network,nothing else!

— dislikes —
Info and documentation is missing or hard to find.

Recent Posts

Web Server Upgraded Apache HTTPD 2.4.26

     Our web server software has been upgraded to Apache httpd 2.4.26.

     This primarily improves HTTP 2.0, it does some things to further enhance speed, reliability, and security for this new HTTP protocol.  There are minor improvements to other aspects of Apache as well.

Apache HTTP Server 2.4.26 Released

June 19, 2017

The Apache Software Foundation and the Apache HTTP Server Project are pleased to announce the release of version 2.4.26 of the Apache HTTP Server (“Apache”). This version of Apache is our latest GA release of the new generation 2.4.x branch of Apache HTTPD and represents fifteen years of innovation by the project, and is recommended over all previous releases. This release of Apache is a security, feature, and bug fix release.

We consider this release to be the best version of Apache available, and encourage users of all prior versions to upgrade.

Apache HTTP Server 2.4.26 is available for download from:

http://httpd.apache.org/download.cgi

Please see the CHANGES_2.4 file, linked from the download page, for a full list of changes. A condensed list, CHANGES_2.4.26 includes only those changes introduced since the prior 2.4 release. A summary of all of the security vulnerabilities addressed in this and earlier releases is available:

http://httpd.apache.org/security/vulnerabilities_24.html

This release requires the Apache Portable Runtime (APR), minimum version 1.5.x, and APR-Util, minimum version 1.5.x. Some features may require the 1.6.x version of both APR and APR-Util. The APR libraries must be upgraded for all features of httpd to operate correctly.

Apache HTTP Server 2.4 provides a number of improvements and enhancements over the 2.2 version. A listing and description of these features is available via:

http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.4/new_features_2_4.html

This release builds on and extends the Apache 2.2 API. Modules written for Apache 2.2 will need to be recompiled in order to run with Apache 2.4, and require minimal or no source code changes.

http://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/httpd/httpd/branches/2.4.x/VERSIONING

When upgrading or installing this version of Apache, please bear in mind that if you intend to use Apache with one of the threaded MPMs (other than the Prefork MPM), you must ensure that any modules you will be using (and the libraries they depend on) are thread-safe.

Please note that Apache Web Server Project will only provide maintenance releases of the 2.2.x flavor through June of 2017, and will provide some security patches beyond this date through at least December of 2017. Minimal maintenance patches of 2.2.x are expected throughout this period, and users are strongly encouraged to promptly complete their transitions to the the 2.4.x flavor of httpd to benefit from a much larger assortment of minor security and bug fixes as well as new features.

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